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Smoking Increases Risk of Multiple Sclerosis -Study

"Smokers are up to three times as likely to develop multiple sclerosis than nonsmokers, researchers said on Monday. "

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If you're still smoking I don't think that this will make any difference, we already knew that:

Smoking was responsible for 70 percent of all cancer deaths and nearly 19 percent of cardiovascular disease deaths in Missouri in 1995. Missouri Department of Health; Center for Health Information Management & Epidemiology. Smoking-Attributable Mortality in Missouri. Monthly Vital Statistics 1998 March;32(1).

Lung cancer has now surpassed heart disease as the leading cause of smoke-related deaths among white middle-class smokers. Thun MJ. Excess Mortality Among Cigarette Smokers: Changes in a 20-year Interval. American Journal of Public Health 1995; 85(9):1223-30.

Smokers have a 50 percent greater chance of contracting a deadly form of adult leukemia. Napier K. Cigarettes: what the warning label doesn’t tell you: the first comprehensive guide to the health consequences of smoking. NY: American Council on Science and Health; 1996.

Smoking doubles the risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Silverman DT, Dunn JA, Hoover RN, Schiffman M, Lillemoe KD, Schoenberg JB, et al. Cigarette smoking and pancreas cancer: A case-control study based on direct interviews. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 1994; 86(20):1510-16.

Smoking is a risk factor for developing rheumatoid arthritis. Symmons DPM, et al. Blood Transfusion, Smoking, and Obesity as Risk Factors for the Development of Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results from a Primary Care-Based Incident Case-Control Study in Norfolk, England. Arthritis & Rheumatism 1997; 40:1955-1961.

According to a recent study, smokers have a 70 percent greater risk of suffering from hearing loss than nonsmokers. Cruickshanks K, Klein R, Klein BE, Wiley TL, Nondahl DM, Tweed TS. Journal of the American Medical Association 1998; 279(21):1715-1719.

Smoking increases the chance of developing cataracts and other eye diseases. Napier K. Cigarettes: what the warning label doesn’t tell you: the first comprehensive guide to the health consequences of smoking. NY: American Council on Science and Health; 1996.

Smokers who develop skin cancer are more likely to die of their disease than nonsmokers. Napier K. Cigarettes: what the warning label doesn’t tell you: the first comprehensive guide to the health consequences of smoking. NY: American Council on Science and Health; 1996.

Smoking increases the risk of duodenal ulcers, Crohn’s Disease, and colon polyps. Napier K. Cigarettes: what the warning label doesn’t tell you: the first comprehensive guide to the health consequences of smoking. NY: American Council on Science and Health; 1996.

Women who quit smoking may dramatically reduce their risk of cervical cancer. Szarewski A, Jarvis MJ, Sasieni P, Anderson M, Edwards R, Steele SJ, et al. Effect of smoking cessation on cervical lesion size. Lancet 1996; 347(9006):941-3.

Women who are exposed to tobacco smoke (smoking and secondhand smoke) every day are two to three times more likely to develop breast cancer. Morabia A, Bernstein M, Heritier S, Khatchatrian N. Relation of breast cancer with passive and active exposure to tobacco smoke. American Journal of Epidemiology 1996; 143(1):918-28.

Smoking increases the chance of developing colorectal, bladder, kidney, and pancreatic cancers. Napier K. Cigarettes: what the warning label doesn’t tell you: the first comprehensive guide to the health consequences of smoking. NY: American Council on Science and Health; 1996.

Smoking increases the chance of impotence in males. Napier K. Cigarettes: what the warning label doesn’t tell you: the first comprehensive guide to the health consequences of smoking. NY: American Council on Science and Health; 1996.

Smoking impairs sperm motility and normal development, increasing chances of infertility, miscarriage and birth defects. Napier K. Cigarettes: what the warning label doesn’t tell you: the first comprehensive guide to the health consequences of smoking. NY: American Council on Science and Health; 1996.

Cigarette smoking is a major cause of heart disease among both men and women. Smokers have twice the risk of heart attack of nonsmokers. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC Fact Book 2000/2001. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/maso/factbook/main.htm. Accessed May 21, 2002.

A recent study found that current smokers sustained their first acute myocardial infarction (heart attack) more than 10 years earlier than non-smokers, and the younger smokers had a higher mortality rate. Weiner P, Waizman WP, Weiner M, Rabner M, Magadle R, Zamir D. Smoking and first acute myocardial infarction: age, mortality and smoking cessation rate. Israel Medical Association Journal 2000; 2(6):446-9.

Long-term cigarette smoking is associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer mortality in both men and women. Chao A, Thun MJ, Jacobs EJ, Henley SJ, Rodriguez C, Calle EE. Cigarette smoking and colorectal cancer mortality in the cancer prevention study II. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 2000; 92(23):1888-1896.

More than 4,000 chemicals, including 43 known carcinogens and over 400 other toxins, can be found in cigarette smoke. Glantz S. Tobacco: Biology & Politics. Waco, TX: Health Edco; 1992.

People who smoke one pack or more of cigarettes per day are more likely to suffer vision loss (macular degeneration) than those who never smoked. Seddon JM, Willett W, Speizer FE, Hankinson SE. A prospective Study of Cigarette Smoking and Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Women. Journal of the American Medical Association 1996; 276:1141-1146.

People who smoke more than a pack of cigarettes per day are nearly twice as likely as nonsmokers to develop diabetes. Rimm EB, Chan J, Stampfer MJ, Colditz GA, Willett WC. Prospective study of cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and the risk of diabetes in men. British Medical Journal 1995; 310(6979):555-9.

Long-term cigarette smoking is associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer mortality in both men and women. Chao A, Thun MJ, Jacobs EJ, Henley SJ, Rodriguez C, Calle EE. Cigarette smoking and colorectal cancer mortality in the cancer prevention study II. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 2000; 92(23):1888-96.

October 28, 2003 in research | Permalink

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